Monthly Archives: February 2018

Response to VVEV: Section II – Mars

This entry is part 1 of 2 in the series Visions, Ventures, and Escape Velocities

VVEV is illustrated by Maciej Rebis

This is Part 2 of a five-part response to Visions, Ventures, and Escape Velocities: A Collection of Space Futures, which is available for free from Arizona State University’s Center for Science and the Imagination thanks to a grant from NASA. I say “response” and not “review” because I do not intend to critique fictional stories or the non-fiction essays contained in the collection, but to engage with the ideas presented from my own point of view.

Section II of VVEV is entitled Mars, and contains two short stories and two essays:

  • The Baker of Mars, by Karl Schroeder
  • Exploration Fact and Exploration Fiction, by Lawrence Dritsas
  • Death on Mars, by Madeline Ashby
  • Life on Mars?, by Steve Ruff

This blog post contains spoilers!

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Review of “The Swerve” by Stephen Greenblatt

The Swerve: How the World Became ModernThe Swerve: How the World Became Modern by Stephen Greenblatt
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

On the surface, it is the story of Poggio Bracciolini, a 15th century Italian scholar who uncovers one of the last remaining manuscripts of Lucretius’s On the Nature of Things. The meta-story is really about the power of ideas to survive the fall of empire, the dark ages that come after, and re-emerge as the seeds of enlightenment. The narrative is engaging and coherent, and I left both inspired by humanism but also regretting how much knowledge must have been destroyed over the centuries by the forces of superstition and dogma.

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Review of “The Wright Brothers” by David McCullough

The Wright BrothersThe Wright Brothers by David McCullough
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

My first audiobook! I chose a topic of which I had prior knowledge, but I was surprised how many new things I learned from McCullough’s account of the Wright brothers’ journey to making the world’s first controlled, powered flight in an airplane. Like all good historical nonfiction, the account interweaves the individual human level with the big picture. McCullough shows the personal lives of the Wright family as well as the broader technological and political implications and context of their work.

I especially enjoy that the book is also a fine counter to the myth that genius is the product of natural talents and sudden epiphany. McCullough shows the childhood influences the brothers had to encourage tinkering and creativity, and details at length the decades of thought, experimentation, innovation, and perseverance through failure, injury, and ridicule that were necessary to arrive at their world-changing achievements. The book is as much a testament to the personal qualities and character of the whole Wright family as it is an account of their technological contribution to history.

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